Safety Techniques

Tornado Survival

Tornadoes are among nature’s most violent storms. They can be incredibly destructive and will extend to the ground

with whirling winds that can reach more than 300 mph. If the tornado does not make ground contact, it is called a

funnel cloud

If the tornado makes contact with water, it is called a waterspout. Funnel cloud and waterspout tornadoes may last only a few seconds, or they may continue for more than an hour.

Tornadoes can occur in any state but occur more frequently from the Gulf Coast and across a band of states from Texas to Wisconsin. This area has been nicknamed "Tornado Alley." Tornadoes can develop at any time, but they are most

common between 3pm-9pm during April, May and June.

Some tornadoes are clearly visible; however, others can be obscured by low-hanging clouds or rain. Occasionally,

tornadoes develop so rapidly that little, if any, advance warning is possible. Tornadoes can uproot trees, destroy buildings, and turn harmless objects into deadly missiles in a matter of seconds. Damage paths can be in excess of one mile wide and 50 miles long.

Survival Planning Tips:

• Find out how your communities tornado warning system sounds an alert.

• Purchase a NOAA Weather Radio with a warning alarm tone and battery backup. Listen for tornado watches and

warnings.

• Learn the language of your weather reporter on a Watch or Warning:

Tornado Watch - Tornados are likely. Be ready to take shelter. Stay tuned to radio and television stations for

additional information.

Tornado Warning - A tornado has been sighted in the area or is indicated by radar. Immediately take shelter.

• Implement an Emergency Preparedness Plan that takes prevention, emergency response, and disaster recovery into consideration.

• If you’re a business owner, develop a contingency plan to allow for continued business operations.

• Practice periodic tornado drills so everyone knows how to respond if a tornado is approaching.

• Secure large exterior / interior objects that could cause major damage if torn free.

• Close and secure all doors and windows during approaching storms.

• Evacuate personnel from mobile home-size buildings. These structures offer no protection from tornadoes. Also,

Auditoriums, cafeterias and gymnasiums that are covered with a flat, wide-span roof are not safe and should not be

Utilized as a shelter.

• If you are outside, get to a basement, a sturdy building, or lie in a ditch or low-lying area.

• The best protection in a tornado is usually an underground area. If an underground area is not available, consider:

• Small interior rooms on the lowest floor and without windows

• Hallways on the lowest floor away from doors and windows

• Rooms constructed with reinforced concrete, brick or block with no windows and a heavy concrete floor or roof system overhead

• Protected areas away from doors and windows

• Remember to protect your head with your arms and crouch down in shelters

Tornados may strike quickly, with little or no warning and may appear nearly transparent until dust and debris are picked up or a cloud forms in the funnel; which may be too late. Be safe. Take note of the topics and recommendations

discussed in this bulletin. We encourage you to put them into practice – doing so helps ensure your safety.

It is the philosophy of your Independent Insurance Agent to provide services that give policyholders peace of mind. We truly are with you all the way.

Posted 2:09 PM

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